Managing Your Seizures

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Reducing the number of seizures that a person has may help to minimise the risk of seizure-related injury or death. There are a number of actions that may help:

Regular Reviews

Annual reviews with your epilepsy specialist are highly recommended, and if your seizures are not controlled, then it will need to be more frequent. This is a good opportunity to ask questions about how you can best manage your seizures. Be honest with your doctor so your treatment is adjusted if needed.

Getting medication right 

Antiepileptic medication is the most effective way to control seizures for most people. Some types of epilepsy respond better to certain medications. With an accurate diagnosis doctors can prescribe the correct medication to best help reduce your seizures.

If you continue to have seizures, make another appointment or ask to be referred to an epilepsy specialist (if you don’t already see one) for a review of your diagnosis and treatment options.

Medication side effects 

Antiepileptic medication may cause unwanted side effects. Often people find these side effects are worse when starting the medication and lessen over time.

Unfortunately unwanted side effects may influence some people to stop taking their medication without seeing the doctor. This can be incredibly dangerous and can cause seizures which may be more severe or prolonged, or in some cases result in death. If you have unwanted side effects that you find intolerable, let your doctor know as there may be other options you can try or changes that can be made – to give you a better balance between seizure control and side effects. See more information about treatment options here.

Knowing & avoiding triggers 

Sometimes you may be aware that specific events or circumstances affect or cause your seizures. These are usually called seizure triggers, and recognising these triggers can help you to reduce or even avoid seizures.

Triggers may include lack of sleep, stress, physical fatigue, missing medication, alcohol or poor health.

Seizures can also be triggered by rapid changes in medication, changing to a new medication or if you forget to take your tablets.

By learning about your triggers and avoiding them where possible you can keep control of your seizures and help keep yourself safer. Keeping a diary can help with identifying seizure triggers.

THE BEST WAY TO LOWER YOUR RISK IS BY
ACHIEVING THE BEST SEIZURE FREEDOM FOR YOU

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