Managing Your Seizures

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Reducing the number of seizures that a person has may help to minimise the risk of seizure-related injury or death. There are a number of actions that may help:

Regular Reviews

It is highly recommended that a person with epilepsy has a regular review with the clinician who manages their epilepsy, as least once each year. Your clinician can help draw up a plan on how to best reduce your seizures. Each person’s plan may be different so ask for their advice and talk openly about your epilepsy. This plan can also help you talk to others about your epilepsy, so they also know how they can support you in reducing the number of seizures you have, and what to do if there is an emergency.

Getting medication right 

Antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment is the most effective way to control seizures. Some types of epilepsy respond better to some medications. By knowing about your seizures (ie: the number, frequency and type of seizures you have) and talking openly with your clinician about this, they can prescribe the correct drug at the appropriate dose to help reduce your seizures. If you continue to have seizures, ask to be referred to an epilepsy specialist (if you don’t already see one) for a review of your diagnosis and treatment options.

Dealing with side effects 

Some people stop taking their epilepsy medication because they have side effects – but this is incredibly dangerous and can bring on seizures or in some cases results in death. If you have side effects, speak with the clinician who monitors your epilepsy as there may be other options you can try or changes that can be made to give you a better balance between seizure control and side effects. See more information on treatment options here.

Knowing & avoiding triggers 

Seizures can often have triggers that you come to recognise. These may include getting anxious or stressed. Sometimes people are affected by lack of sleep, too much alcohol or the fact that they have taken recreational drugs. Seizures can also be triggered by rapid changes in medication or if you forget to take your tablets. By learning about your triggers and avoiding them where possible you can keep control of your seizures and help keep yourself safer.

THE BEST WAY TO LOWER YOUR RISK IS BY
ACHIEVING THE BEST SEIZURE FREEDOM FOR YOU

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